HIV patient numbers increase among PCPs

Article

Primary care providers are increasingly caring for and treating people living with HIV, according to a recent survey by HealthHIV.

PRIMARY CARE PROVIDERS are increasingly caring for and treating people living with HIV, according to a recent survey by HealthHIV, a nonprofit advocacy group.

HealthHIV surveyed nearly 1,200 primary care providers and HIV specialists. More than half (54%) of primary care respondents say they are treating HIV-positive patients and 43% said their HIV caseload has "increased" or "increased dramatically" during the past year.

The statistic doesn't come as a surprise to Sharon Lee, MD, a professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center and a primary care physician who has been treating HIV and AIDS patients for 25 years.

Like many aging patients, they're coping with chronic conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease, and they're already in the primary care system for those other medical problems, she says.

Related Videos
Lawrence Eichenfield, MD, an expert on atopic dermatitis
Video 5 - "Obstacles in Adapting Diabetes Technology to Individual Needs" - 1 KOL is featured
Lawrence Eichenfield, MD, an expert on atopic dermatitis
Lawrence Eichenfield, MD, an expert on atopic dermatitis
Video 4 - "The Impact of Continuous Glucose Monitors & Digital Solutions on Diabetes Care"
Video 3 - "The Pivotal Role of Patient Engagement and Education in Achieving Optimal Diabetes Outcomes"
Lawrence Eichenfield, MD, an expert on atopic dermatitis
Lawrence Eichenfield, MD, an expert on atopic dermatitis
Video 2 - "Addressing Coexisting Conditions: Keys to Comprehensive Diabetes Care"
Related Content
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.