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Erectile dysfunction associated with CV events, all-cause mortality

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Patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) have a 44% increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events, according to a study, published online in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

 

Patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) have a 44% increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events, according to a study, published online in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

The study was led by Charalambos Vlachopoulos, MD, with Athens Medical School in Athens, Greece.

ED patients also have a 25% increased risk of all-cause mortality, a 62% increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), and a 39% increased risk of cerebrovascular events, compared to patients without ED.

“Our results stress the importance of early diagnosis of ED and the meticulous cardiovascular investigation that is required in specific groups of ED patients,” Vlachopoulos wrote.  

The relative risk of CV events was higher in younger patients and in intermediate-risk groups. “This is particularly important because this intermediate-risk group is in need of further reclassification with a predictor such as ED,” Vlachopoulous wrote.

The researchers analyzed 14 studies with 92,000 participants.

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