Common skills shared by successful health execs

March 20, 2016

The Managed Healthcare Executive Editorial Advisory Board says these skills are critical to be a successful healthcare executive today. Do you have what it takes?

 

Eight skills shared by successful
health execs

 

The Managed Healthcare Executive Editorial Advisory Board says these skills are critical to be a successful healthcare executive today.

 

 

 

The ability to focus on the consumer

 

- Don Hall, principal, DeltaSigma LLC

 

 

"I think the most critical skill is the ability to keep you and your team focused on the customer. It's easy to get distracted as you deal with all the issues facing you, but far and away the most important issue you face each day is taking care of your plan's customers."

 

 

 

 

 

The ability to act and think quickly 

 

- Daniel J. Hilferty, president and chief executive officer, Independence Blue Cross

 

 


"In a healthcare environment that is changing at lightning speed, healthcare executives must anticipate trends and pivot strategically so they are best positioned to succeed. In addition to thinking ahead, executives must also be nimble and quick to act so they don’t get left behind when the next big idea hits."

 

 

 

The ability to be open about shortcomings

 

- David Calabrese, vice president and chief pharmacy officer, OptumRx

 

 

 


"We must have genuine humility: Be open and honest about our shortcomings; avoid boastful, arrogant behavior; be quick to praise others for a job well done; and be open and accepting of learning opportunities-all of which will make it more likely that we will grow personally and will likely open more doors up for us in the future."

 

 

The ability to embrace change 

- Douglas Chaet, senior vice president, contracting and provider networks, Independence Blue Cross

 

 

 


"It’s important that we meet the 'challenge of change' and commit to finding a better way to deliver efficient, quality healthcare."

 

 

 

The ability to prioritize effectively

 

- Kevin Ronneberg, MD, vice president and associate medical director of health initiatives, HealthPartners

 

 


"Being able to prioritize and stay committed to work that is in support of your strategic objectives is critical. You must master the art of saying no, and choose to not work on projects that have inherent value yet aren’t prioritized whether due to strategic goals, timing or resources.  You also need to be able to step back and reassess priorities frequently to ensure that you are aligned with a continuously changing industry landscape or work environment."

 

 

The ability to anticipate and prepare wisely

 

- David Calabrese, vice president and chief pharmacy officer, OptumRx

 


"Adequately preparing yourself for any given task ensures confidence, portrays commitment, and limits the ability to be caught off guard or to make hasty decisions."

 

 

 

 

The ability to be a good listener

 

- Joel Brill, MD, medical director for Predictive Health, LLC

 

 

 

 

"Listen, listen, listen. Take the time to learn what is important to the other person/entity/group etc. Be flexible and think creatively to demonstrate your and your organization’s value as you collaborate to achieve win-win solutions."

 

 

 

 

The ability to collaborate

 

- David Calabrese, vice president and chief pharmacy officer, OptumRx

 

"In today’s highly complex, matrixed healthcare world, none of us can go it alone.  We must not be close-minded and must approach each and every day in a positive, good-natured and open fashion relative to how we work with others.  In turn, this behavior will translate into greater openness amongst others to do the same in return."