Americans think prevention could be cure for what ails healthcare

November 1, 2007

Dallas-Recently released results of a consumer survey show that a majority of Americans believe more emphasis on preventive medicine is a solution to the increasingly evident problems of the nation's healthcare system.

DALLAS-Recently released results of a consumer survey show that a majority of Americans believe more emphasis on preventive medicine is a solution to the increasingly evident problems of the nation's healthcare system.

The survey, which polled a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults 18 years or older, was conducted by International Communications Research (ICR) and commissioned by U.S. Preventive Medicine, a Dallas-based firm that develops programs aimed at advancing prevention in healthcare.

Those surveyed were asked their opinion on solutions to the nation's healthcare challenges. According to the survey results, 68.6% of respondents said they favored a greater national emphasis on preventive health services. Others (61.3%) favored government-required health insurance for everyone (i.e., universal healthcare), while 48% said they favored tax incentives that encourage saving money for medical needs (health savings accounts).

Other survey findings include:

"Every American should be on a prevention plan, but we see only fragmented efforts to provide it, so we decided to develop our own," Fey says. "We're working with the appropriate medical organizations to do so."

He says roll-out of the proposed plan could occur next year.