Pediatrics

 

FDA Updates: Treatment for Duchenne Mutation, Gilead Seeks Remdesivir Approval, Data on ALKS 3831

August 16, 2020

Actions from FDA this week include approval of a second targted treatment for a Duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation, and filings in COVID-19 and blood disorders.

FDA Updates: Assays Used in Cancer Care Get Green Light

August 09, 2020

Adaptive Biotechnologies’ clonoSEQ gets third approval; FDA also acts on first at-home treatment for spinal muscular atrophy.

Hospital CEO Keeps Pediatric Care Local

July 15, 2018

This month’s featured exec is Deborah Feldman, president and CEO of Dayton Children’s Hospital. Here, she sheds light on how the future of healthcare is shaping up, and how value-based care, the ACA, and pediatric pain management fit in.

Medical science sure to help us live longer

October 01, 2006

Would you pay $19,900 to add another year to your life? If only it were that simple. The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) recently published a study that concluded between 1960 and 2000, we paid an average of $19,900 in medical costs per year of life gained during that time. In 1960, a newborn's life expectancy was 69.9 years, and in 2000, it was 76.87 years, according to the study.

Rural access route: E-health investments and network of support facilities help connect rural residents to high-quality care

September 01, 2006

Telemedicine programs decrease time-to-diagnosis, save financial resources and reduce hospital stays.

Medicaid and uninsured as percent of pediatric emergency department* visits in certain markets, 2004

September 01, 2006

Medicaid and uninsured as percent of pediatric emergency department* visits in certain markets, 2004

Pediatric emergency department* visit growth by acuity and payer type, 2004

August 01, 2006

Pediatric emergency department visit growth by acuity and payer type, 2004

Infusion of advanced vaccines: Medications that change history also present logistical questions

July 01, 2006

Drug Manufacturers have introduced vaccines for meningococcal disease, shingles, pertussis, rotavirus, and cervical cancer, meanwhile even more vaccines are in the development pipeline. While each represents a major step forward for public health, the advances present an assortment of challenges from payment rates for physicians to moral issues for parents.

Politics aside, we have a chance to prevent a deadly cancer

July 01, 2006

About two hours after a colleague and I lamented over breakfast about Americans' shortcomings in wellness, I heard the news that the vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV) had received the final nod from FDA. Now there was something Americans were actually doing pretty well: immunizing.

Programs tip scales toward health as rate of overweight childrenincreases

June 01, 2006

Childhood obesity and its inherent health risks have become a majorhealth crisis. Just a few decades ago, the idea of an obesityepidemic would have seemed inconceivable. As late as the 1960s and1970s, the rate of overweight children remained steady and nominal.By the mid-1980s, however, the numbers began rising and by the1990s, they were surging. In fact, obesity in children ages 6 to 11years has quadrupled the last 25 years and doubled for adolescents,according to the Centers for Disease Control.

More information needed for medical genomic application

May 01, 2006

All projections of rising healthcare costs assume that advances inmedical science will add to the cost. This is a reasonableassumption, since it has been uniformly true in the past.Antibiotics are a great advance, but bacteria develop resistanceand newer and more expensive antibiotics must be developed. Peoplewho would have died at home in the pre-antibiotic era now survive,but after the greater cost of antibiotics and, possibly,hospitalization. The same is true for advances in cardiac stents,cancer treatment, imaging with CT scanners and MRIs, etc. Thetechnology can be life-saving but is typically expensive.

Beneficiaries getting caught between a rock and a copay

March 01, 2006

If misery loves company, then Beverly Thomas of Carbondale, Ill.,isn't alone. She is one of thousands of dual eligibles(beneficiaries covered by both Medicaid and Medicare) who went tothe pharmacy after January 1, 2006, only to find that it would notfill their prescriptions. Unfortunately, her medication for mentalillness is so critical that if she misses even a day, she could behospitalized. With the help of Southern Illinois Regional SocialServices, Thomas got squared away, but admits she still is confusedabout how the new Medicare Part D benefit operates.

Comprehensive infertility coverage can add value to benefit design

January 01, 2006

Most cost estimates for infertility treatment, including IVF, range from $4 to $6 per member per year.

EMRs offer return on investment

December 01, 2005

EMRs can add to a practice's bottom line

Challenges of pulmonary hypertension make it an ideal candidate for DM

December 01, 2005

Today's Approach to interventions that address chronic disease and conditions is both broader and deeper than ever before. But there is another group of patients who rarely, if ever, directly benefit from these programs. According to Alan Wright, MD, former chief medical officer of TheraCom, these are patients who might use more than $100,000 a year in pharmaceutical spending and/or resources, patients who have a disease that is progressive with no known cure. These are the patients who have a rare disease, such as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a rare blood vessel disorder characterized by increased pressure in the pulmonary artery.

Hispanic Market Momentum

September 01, 2005

If managed care organizations are doing their homework and reading the statistics, they would know that conscientiously marketing specific services to the Hispanic population would reap a rich pay-off. Hispanics are the fastest growing group in the country; the U.S. Census Bureau estimates that after 2020, Hispanics will add more people to the U.S. population every year than all other race/ethnic groups combined.

Hispanic Market Momentum

September 01, 2005

If managed care organizations are doing their homework and reading the statistics, they would know that conscientiously marketing specific services to the Hispanic population would reap a rich pay-off. Hispanics are the fastest growing group in the country; the U.S. Census Bureau estimates that after 2020, Hispanics will add more people to the U.S. population every year than all other race/ethnic groups combined.

Rotational therapies aid in treating psoriasis

September 01, 2005

Mild to moderate psoriasis is generally treated first with topical corticosteroids and other topical remedies. When the disease is widespread or unresponsive to topical agents, ultraviolet phototherapy may be used at home or in the physician's office.

Creative come-ons encourage more generic utilization

June 01, 2005

Generics should get a large boost in the next few years as branded drugs accounting for more than $38 billion, including Prevacid, Prevachol, Zocor, Zoloft and Paxil, are expected to come off patent by the end of 2008. With the generic dispensing rate remaining under 42% over the past 10 years, there is room for improvement; savings of nearly 1% by plan sponsors for every 1% increase in the use of generics, according to Express Scripts.

Large plan shops DM boutiques for best in breed services

June 01, 2005

The marketplace increasingly relies on multi-specialty DM companies, but one organization is pursuing a contrarian approach for disease management. Cypress, Calif.-based PacifiCare Health Systems is following what Gordon K. Norman, MD, its vice president for disease management, calls a "best of breed" strategy.